It Takes Guts

A time for action...running the gauntlet

David Glasgow Farragut had guts…and it showed in his decision to push past the forts protecting New Orleans.  For seven full days, the Union navy had shelled Forts Jackson and St. Philip.  Some ships were shaken to pieces by the repeated concussions, well over 15,000 shells were fired.  Farragut had enough by April 24, 1862, ordering his ships to steam past the forts at 2a.m.  Aggressive action was lacking in the Union war effort through most of 1862.  Farragut’s decision was precisely the type Lincoln had been waiting for.

Confederate defenses approaching New Orleans

Farragut’s fleet took damage… but the Confederates had no answer for the boldness of the move.  Once past the forts, Farragut’s ships easily defeated a makeshift fleet sent to meet them at the mouth of the harbor.  A desperate attempt to set Farragut’s flagship on fire was also stymied and the city was his for the taking.  At noon on April 25, 1862, Farragut climbed onto the levee of New Orleans.  Four days later, 10,000 Union troops occupied the city.

Forget heroics, it just takes guts

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