Tag Archives: assassination

Looking to the Future

Lincoln gave his last public address on April 11, 1865… and reconstruction was on his mind.  He was just back from Richmond, the front, and high level meetings with Grant.  But, he was ready to bring his nation back together- to “heal the wounds” as he stated in the Second Inaugural.

Final days

Final days

By these recent successes the re-inauguration of the national authority — reconstruction — which has had a large share of thought from the first, is pressed much more closely upon our attention. It is fraught with great difficulty. Unlike a case of a war between independent nations, there is no authorized organ for us to treat with. No one man has authority to give up the rebellion for any other man. We simply must begin with, and mold from, disorganized and discordant elements. Nor is it a small additional embarrassment that we, the loyal people, differ among ourselves as to the mode, manner, and means of reconstruction.”

 

There was difficult work ahead and Lincoln anticipated a new battle… with members of the opposition and his own party.  Three days later, Boothe’s treachery had far reaching effects no one could have foreseen.

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Facts in Five

McKinley Assassination Edition

  • Leon Czolgosz tried unsuccessfully to join Emma Goldman’s anarchist circle
  • McKinley attended the national encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic before arriving in Buffalo for the Pan-American Exposition.
  • Czolgosz planned to shoot McKinley on September 5th, but could not get close during the Presidential speech.
  • Security officers repeatedly pummeled Czolgosz after the shooting- until McKinley ordered them to stop, “Go easy on him now boys…”
  • Gangrene in the digestive tract killed McKinley
Assassination

Assassination

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Looking to the Future

Lincoln gave his last public address on April 11, 1865… and reconstruction was on his mind.  He was just back from Richmond, the front, and high level meetings with Grant.  But, he was ready to bring his nation back together- to “heal the wounds” as he stated in the Second Inaugural.

Final days

Final days

By these recent successes the re-inauguration of the national authority — reconstruction — which has had a large share of thought from the first, is pressed much more closely upon our attention. It is fraught with great difficulty. Unlike a case of a war between independent nations, there is no authorized organ for us to treat with. No one man has authority to give up the rebellion for any other man. We simply must begin with, and mold from, disorganized and discordant elements. Nor is it a small additional embarrassment that we, the loyal people, differ among ourselves as to the mode, manner, and means of reconstruction.”

 

There was difficult work ahead and Lincoln anticipated a new battle… with members of the opposition and his own party.  Three days later, Boothe’s treachery had far reaching effects no one could have foreseen.

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Useless, Useless

The History Channel has wasted far too much…broadcast time to the outlandish theories of John Wilkes Booth surviving April 26, 1865.  There were far too many witnesses to his death for the escape stories to be true.  The most noteworthy was Booth accomplice, David Herold, who surrendered minutes before Sergeant Boston Corbett shot Booth through the neck.  Looking at his hands, Booth’s final words were “Useless, Useless.”   A true moment of clarity.

Never had the courage to fight for his cause

Booth wanted a stage for his infamous act… he did not want the assassination to be a secretive, or unseen performance.  He knew the audience would witness the death of Lincoln and his final curtain call was to Booth, the perfect ending to a middling career.  A minor celebrity, Booth could have visited the White House and most likely would have received an audience with Lincoln.  Booth could have killed Lincoln in a number of different ways, but behind closed doors, away from the eyes of a captive audience.  Only fitting that the great actor was killed in an ordinary tobacco barn with only Union soldiers to observe his final moments.  His family, all registered Republicans, disowned him for his treachery.  Booth died that day, despite what the History Channel purports in its programming.

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Filed under Ephemera, Uncategorized

Useless, Useless

The History Channel has wasted far too much…broadcast time to the outlandish theories of John Wilkes Booth surviving April 26, 1865.  There were far too many witnesses to his death for the escape stories to be true.  The most noteworthy was Booth accomplice, David Herold, who surrendered minutes before Sergeant Boston Corbett shot Booth through the neck.  Looking at his hands, Booth’s final words were “Useless, Useless.”   A true moment of clarity.

Never had the courage to fight for his cause

Booth wanted a stage for his infamous act… he did not want the assassination to be a secretive, or unseen performance.  He knew the audience would witness the death of Lincoln and his final curtain call was to Booth, the perfect ending to a middling career.  A minor celebrity, Booth could have visited the White House and most likely would have received an audience with Lincoln.  Booth could have killed Lincoln in a number of different ways, but behind closed doors, away from the eyes of a captive audience.  Only fitting that the great actor was killed in an ordinary tobacco barn with only Union soldiers to observe his final moments.  His family, all registered Republicans, disowned him for his treachery.  Booth died that day, despite what the History Channel purports in its programming.

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Filed under Ephemera, Uncategorized