Tag Archives: Hoover

Terror at Home

The assassination of William McKinley by an anarchist… was still fresh in the minds of the US Justice Dept.  The triumph of the Bolsheviks in 1917 prompted radicals in America to step up their campaign of violence.  Anarchists agitated through organized labor and started a campaign of violence not seen since the end of the Civil War.

Domestic enemies everywhere

Domestic enemies everywhere

April, May, and June of 1919 was a time of terror… from a foreign threat hiding among us.  Eastern European radicals first sent 30 letter bombs to businessmen and law enforcement officers  around the country, killing two people.  In June, the anarchists struck again, placing packaged bombs at the homes of government officials, including Attorney General, A. Mitchell Palmer.  Two more people were killed- flyers were distributed around the country declaring war on capitalism.  The American people demanded action.

Come_unto_me,_ye_opprest

Palmer responded by setting into motion… the newly created investigative bureau, headed by 24 year old J. Edgar Hoover.  The orders were simple- find the radicals, arrest and deport them.  Hoover launched sweeping raids in 23 states.  Over 3000 people were arrested, many without warrants or indictments.  Communist organizers, Eastern Europeans, and union agitators were targeted.  As the raids grew in intensity, critics emerged to challenge their constitutionality.  By 1920, the public seemed to lose interest in combating the terror threat posed by the anarchists.

palmer2

Palmer once was considered a Presidential hopeful… but the raids ultimately cost him his political career.  American public opinion turned against the heavy handed tactics of Hoover’s FBI, despite the threat still posed by anarchists.  This was clearly on display during the trial of Sacco and Vanzetti in 1920- Two self-confessed anarchists tried for murder and robbery, and public opinion was decidedly against the government’s case.   The violence continued with little public outcry….

 

 

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Always Take a Second Look

Presidents long viewed as below average… or failures tend to be associated with significant historical events.  Actions taken during these events can be overlooked due to hindsight; historians possess the benefit of knowing the paths actually traveled.  Ineffective policy is easily tossed aside in historical assessments because hindsight provides the student of history with an alternate and possibly more effective course.  Executive action is also overlooked in the context of significant history.  Events that change the course of history are often analyzed with little thought afforded the actions of the President.  Take these examples….

A tax and spend Liberal? According to John Nance Garner, YES !

Herbert Hoover did nothing about the Great Depression… The Great Depression was a transformative historical event and Hoover’s attempts to stem the coming flood have been long overlooked.  His policies did not prevent the deepening of the Depression, so they are discarded so historians can prepare students for the coming of the New Deal.   Hoover often misspoke about the state of the economy, like encouraging Americans to “work harder”  when work was more difficult to find.

  • Hoover signed bills creating the National Finance Corporation and the Emergency Relief Act.  These two laws gave huge government building contracts to select businesses around the country.  The laws pumped $4 Billion dollars to American economy.
  • Hoover signed two tax increases that raised the top marginal rate from 24% -63%  and the corporate rate from 11%-18%.  These were the first tax hikes in over 20 years.
  • Hoover was lambasted by the Roosevelt campaign in 1932 for taxing and spending the country into socialism.   New Deal Democrats later admitted that many of their programs were simply boosts to bills signed by Hoover.

How do you say ‘hippie’ in French?

Richard Nixon was a war criminal… The Vietnam war changed America in countless ways.  The New Left school of historic thought dominated the scholarship about Vietnam with anti-government rhetoric and a firm belief that grass-roots activism trumped strategic policy.  Nixon’s decision to attack NVA bases in Cambodia put him near the top of their list of villains.

Consider the policies enacted by these two Presidents… in terms of the issues that faced the American people.  Should they be considered failures?

Leave a comment

Filed under Ephemera, News

Terror at Home

The assassination of William McKinley by an anarchist… was still fresh in the minds of the US Justice Dept.  The triumph of the Bolsheviks in 1917 prompted radicals in America to step up their campaign of violence.  Anarchists agitated through organized labor and started a campaign of violence not seen since the end of the Civil War.

Domestic enemies everywhere

Domestic enemies everywhere

April, May, and June of 1919 was a time of terror… from a foreign threat hiding among us.  Eastern European radicals first sent 30 letter bombs to businessmen and law enforcement officers  around the country, killing two people.  In June, the anarchists struck again, placing packaged bombs at the homes of government officials, including Attorney General, A. Mitchell Palmer.  Two more people were killed- flyers were distributed around the country declaring war on capitalism.  The American people demanded action.

Come_unto_me,_ye_opprest

Palmer responded by setting into motion… the newly created investigative bureau, headed by 24 year old J. Edgar Hoover.  The orders were simple- find the radicals, arrest and deport them.  Hoover launched sweeping raids in 23 states.  Over 3000 people were arrested, many without warrants or indictments.  Communist organizers, Eastern Europeans, and union agitators were targeted.  As the raids grew in intensity, critics emerged to challenge their constitutionality.  By 1920, the public seemed to lose interest in combating the terror threat posed by the anarchists.

palmer2

Palmer once was considered a Presidential hopeful… but the raids ultimately cost him his political career.  American public opinion turned against the heavy handed tactics of Hoover’s FBI, despite the threat still posed by anarchists.  This was clearly on display during the trial of Sacco and Vanzetti in 1920- Two self-confessed anarchists tried for murder and robbery, and public opinion was decidedly against the government’s case.   The violence continued with little public outcry….

 

 

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Weekly History News Roundup

Indiana Jones would be disappointed… newly translated Hebrew text reveals fate of the Ark of the Covenant

 

Ancient Greeks invented tailgatingarchaeologists uncover portable grills used in ancient feasts

 

Civil War artifacts from 54th Mass. to go on sale… Captain Luis Emilio’s personal items will be auctioned next month

 

Mein Kampf tops ebook charts in 2013publishes troubled by America’s reading habits

 

Burglars who robbed the FBI in 1971 now talking… the crime was never solved, but the robbery changed the Bureau forever

 

Grandparents or thieves?  New book to tell all

Grandparents or thieves? New book to tell all

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Always Take a Second Look

Presidents long viewed as below average… or failures tend to be associated with significant historical events.  Actions taken during these events can be overlooked due to hindsight; historians possess the benefit of knowing the paths actually traveled.  Ineffective policy is easily tossed aside in historical assessments because hindsight provides the student of history with an alternate and possibly more effective course.  Executive action is also overlooked in the context of significant history.  Events that change the course of history are often analyzed with little thought afforded the actions of the President.  Take these examples….

A tax and spend Liberal? According to John Nance Garner, YES !

Herbert Hoover did nothing about the Great Depression… The Great Depression was a transformative historical event and Hoover’s attempts to stem the coming flood have been long overlooked.  His policies did not prevent the deepening of the Depression, so they are discarded so historians can prepare students for the coming of the New Deal.   Hoover often misspoke about the state of the economy, like encouraging Americans to “work harder”  when work was more difficult to find.

  • Hoover signed bills creating the National Finance Corporation and the Emergency Relief Act.  These two laws gave huge government building contracts to select businesses around the country.  The laws pumped $4 Billion dollars to American economy.
  • Hoover signed two tax increases that raised the top marginal rate from 24% -63%  and the corporate rate from 11%-18%.  These were the first tax hikes in over 20 years.
  • Hoover was lambasted by the Roosevelt campaign in 1932 for taxing and spending the country into socialism.   New Deal Democrats later admitted that many of their programs were simply boosts to bills signed by Hoover.

How do you say ‘hippie’ in French?

Richard Nixon was a war criminal… The Vietnam war changed America in countless ways.  The New Left school of historic thought dominated the scholarship about Vietnam with anti-government rhetoric and a firm belief that grass-roots activism trumped strategic policy.  Nixon’s decision to attack NVA bases in Cambodia put him near the top of their list of villains.

Consider the policies enacted by these two Presidents… in terms of the issues that faced the American people.  Should they be considered failures?

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Filed under Ephemera, News