Tag Archives: Impeachment

On Impeachment

Supporters of corrupt Presidents, from Andrew Johnson to Bill Clinton… all use the same erroneous argument about the Impeachment provision of the Constitution.  “But he didn’t commit a high crime!”   

 

If only our Framers had specific indictable crimes in mind when they included… the all important Impeachment provision.  The historical record clearly shows “High crimes and misdemeanors”  is a standard based on all facets of public conduct.

Listen to this rap

In Federalist 65, Hamilton writes : “those offences which proceed from the misconduct of public men, or, in other words, from the abuse or violation of some public trust. They are of a nature which may with peculiar propriety be denominated POLITICAL, as they relate chiefly to injuries done immediately to the society itself.”

 

Madison argues in the Convention debates that impeachment can be used if the President “fails to discharge the duties of his office.”  

The Framer

“it will make him in a peculiar manner, responsible for [the] conduct” of executive officers. subject him to impeachment himself, if he suffers them to perpetrate with impunity high crimes or misdemeanors against the United States, or neglects to superintend their conduct, so as to check their excesses.”

 

Should we scrutinize the current occupant of the White House more diligently? 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Defining Misdemeanors

Madison and Hamilton allowed the grounds for impeachment of the President… open to necessary judgments and deliberations in the House of Representatives.  Madison’s original draft suggested only the term “maladministration” of the duties of the office.  Later amended to “misdemeanors” it is clear that the Framers were not only discussing indictable crimes- public men of this order would be above petty larceny and the like-  abuse of the office and the neglect of official duty is what concerned them.

You doubt our words?

Hamilton explained the difference in Federalist #65:

“Those offences which proceed from the misconduct of public men, or, in other words, from the abuse or violation of some public trust. They are of a nature which may with peculiar propriety be denominated POLITICAL, as they relate chiefly to injuries done immediately to the society itself.”

Impeachment applies to political abuses of the office… not necessarily criminal acts.  Delegates at the ratifying conventions were concerned about the President interfering in the legislative or judicial processes.  Madison responded to the concerns by equating such Constitutional misconduct with criminality:

“Were the President to commit any thing so atrocious… he would be impeached and convicted, as a majority of the states would be affected by his misdemeanor.”

Failing to discharge the duties of his office

The President cannot abuse or misuse the powers of his office… without risking impeachment.  The term “misdemeanor” as applied by the Framers establishes a standard extending far beyond simple criminal acts.  Public men should be held to a greater standard.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under News

On Impeachment

Supporters of corrupt Presidents, from Andrew Johnson to Bill Clinton… all use the same erroneous argument about the Impeachment provision of the Constitution.  “But he didn’t commit a high crime!”   

 

If only our Framers had specific indictable crimes in mind when they included… the all important Impeachment provision.  The historical record clearly shows “High crimes and misdemeanors”  is a standard based on all facets of public conduct.

Listen to this rap

In Federalist 65, Hamilton writes : “those offences which proceed from the misconduct of public men, or, in other words, from the abuse or violation of some public trust. They are of a nature which may with peculiar propriety be denominated POLITICAL, as they relate chiefly to injuries done immediately to the society itself.”

 

Madison argues in the Convention debates that impeachment can be used if the President “fails to discharge the duties of his office.”  

The Framer

“it will make him in a peculiar manner, responsible for [the] conduct” of executive officers. subject him to impeachment himself, if he suffers them to perpetrate with impunity high crimes or misdemeanors against the United States, or neglects to superintend their conduct, so as to check their excesses.”

 

Should we scrutinize the current occupant of the White House more diligently? 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Ramblings of an Antiquated Mind

Only in America… such a reassuring ring to it

 

  • Simply because impeachment is part of the Constitution is a poor excuse to exercise such an option
  • The impeachment process places undue pressure on the republic
  • The country has not fully recovered from the last impeachment crisis…another one may spell the end
  • Barack Obama is guilty of a lot… “high crimes” is a hard standard to establish
  • For the last eight years, our foreign policy has been inept- our enemies have take advantage of the weak hand…
  • No President can ever forget the obligations of the Monroe Doctrine
  • Colorado is creating a permanent under-class that will probably never get off the couch…
  • John Denver would definitely change the words to his song about the Rocky Mountains…
  • Somewhere in America, someone is offended right now–  that’s hilarious…
  • We all need a thicker skin
  • Is it possible for Don Rickles to perform any longer?
  • For profit, corporate charter schools are dangerous
  • For the record- this educator works for a non-profit
  • Charter schools work….so does school choice
Lighten up, America !!!

Lighten up, America !!!

Leave a comment

Filed under Ephemera, News

The Best Remedy?

Has our country really recovered from the 1999… impeachment of President Bill Clinton?  The stifling partisanship tearing apart our republic can largely be traced to this event.  Would our political process be in better shape today had Clinton resigned rather than drag the process to a Senate trial?  Examples in our history have been ignored, due to the partisanship that still controls the interpretation of the events.  Democrats still crow about their “victory” over the sinister Richard Nixon.  Nixon’s resignation is commonly considered the last cowardly act of a beaten politician.  So says the popular breeze…

Forget the Office, this is about ME

Forget the Office, this is about ME

The Watergate scandal shook our government… to its foundation, and there was no impeachment of the President.  One can only imagine the consternation and irreparable damage the Senate trial of Nixon would have caused during an already tumultuous decade.  Nixon’s resignation should be seen as the best resolution to the deep stain of the Watergate era.   The trouble with this interpretation is that it flies in the face of 40 years of conventional thought.  Aging politicos who still bear grudges are not ready to let Nixon fade away.   They will defend the equally dodgy Clinton regardless of the impact on discourse, but cannot bring themselves to reexamine Nixon’s painful, yet proper decision.

It’s time to learn…

More to this image than you think

More to this image than you think

5 Comments

Filed under News

The Best Remedy?

Has our country really recovered from the 1999… impeachment of President Bill Clinton?  The stifling partisanship tearing apart our republic can largely be traced to this event.  Would our political process be in better shape today had Clinton resigned rather than drag the process to a Senate trial?  Examples in our history have been ignored, due to the partisanship that still controls the interpretation of the events.  Democrats still crow about their “victory” over the sinister Richard Nixon.  Nixon’s resignation is commonly considered the last cowardly act of a beaten politician.  So says the popular breeze…

Forget the Office, this is about ME

Forget the Office, this is about ME

The Watergate scandal shook our government… to its foundation, and there was no impeachment of the President.  One can only imagine the consternation and irreparable damage the Senate trial of Nixon would have caused during an already tumultuous decade.  Nixon’s resignation should be seen as the best resolution to the deep stain of the Watergate era.   The trouble with this interpretation is that it flies in the face of 40 years of conventional thought.  Aging politicos who still bear grudges are not ready to let Nixon fade away.   They will defend the equally dodgy Clinton regardless of the impact on discourse, but cannot bring themselves to reexamine Nixon’s painful, yet proper decision.

It’s time to learn…

More to this image than you think

More to this image than you think

3 Comments

Filed under News