Tag Archives: Japan

Facts in Five- Pearl Harbor

Five Steps to Pearl Harbor Edition

  • July 8, 1853– Using gunboat diplomacy, Commodore Matthew Perry threatened to bombard Tokyo unless the Japanese government opened its ports to American trade.
  • September 5, 1905– Japan and Russia sign the treaty of Portsmouth, negotiated by President Theodore Roosevelt, ending the Russo Japanese War.  Three days of Anti-American riots followed, spawned by the belief Roosevelt had cheated the Japanese out of legitimately won war claims. 
  • October 17, 1941– Militarist and Imperialist Hideki Tojo becomes Prime Minister of Japan.  Tojo had been advocating the creation of Pan-Asian Japanese empire since 1934. He considered America “the cancer of the Pacific” that had to be eliminated. 
  • May 1940– President Franklin Roosevelt orders the US Pacific fleet to move its base of operation from San Diego to Pearl Harbor.  Admiral James Richardson vehemently protested the move and was replaced as commander. 
  • November 26, 1941– Secretary of State Cordell Hull presented the Japanese ambassador with our final proposal to resolve the diplomatic impasse between the US and Japan.  Japan was to withdraw from Indochina and China to avoid potential hostilities.  The Japanese strike fleet had left for Hawaii the previous day. 

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Dogma Trumps Intelligence

America’s blind obedience to the dogmas of… monolithic communism and the Domino Theory led to tragedy of the Vietnam war.  In 1945, American intelligence officers established clear and firm links with the Viet Minh and its leader, Ho Chi Minh.  The Vietnamese nationalists of the Viet Minh were resisting Japanese rule and providing our OSS officers with valuable intelligence.  Ho Chi Minh sought the national self-determination Franklin Roosevelt seemed to be promising the world.  The OSS agents believed Ho to be the best alternative to govern Vietnam.  FDR let them both down.

Ho Chi Minh, Giap, and members of the OSS Deer Team

Ho Chi Minh, Giap, and members of the OSS Deer Team

America’s point man in Indochina was… Lt. Col. Archimedes Patti.  Dubbed “The Deer Team,”  Patti’s men contacted the Viet Minh and began to equip and train a select number of their best troops.  In return, the Viet Minh assisted in the recovery of downed American flyers, provided invaluable intelligence, and battled the Japanese.  With the surrender of Japan, Ho Chi Minh was prepared to move forward with Vietnamese independence- a dream thousands of years in the making.

Patti working with Commander Giap in 1945

Patti working with Commander Giap in 1945

Ho Chi Minh dined with Lt. Col. Patti in late August 1945… to discuss the transfer of power and disarming Japanese troops.  Near the end of the meeting, Ho presented Patti a document- a draft of the Vietnamese Declaration of Independence he planned to release on September 2.  Patti was taken aback to read the words of Thomas Jefferson quoted reverently in the brief document.  Both men toasted the future of an independent Vietnam… Patti remembers,   “We had him, we had Ho Chi Minh on a silver platter…the Soviets were in no position to help him-only we could…I did prepare a large number, and I mean about, oh, well over fifteen position papers on our position in Vietnam. But I never knew what happened to them. Those things just disappeared, they just went down the dry well.”

Patti meets with Ho and Giap

Patti meets with Ho and Giap

Roosevelt had already decided to give Indochina… back to the French.  Churchill insisted the French empire not be broken up, lest the British empire would follow.  Rather than disarm Japanese troops, British forces rearmed them and turned them against supporters of Ho Chi Minh’s government.  A temporary division of the country was allowed to solidify.  The OSS agents were marginalized, accused of fomenting revolution, and finally forced out of Saigon by the British commanders.  The expulsion led to the murder of Colonel Peter Dewey, America’s first casualty in Vietnam.  America had followed the wrong course, in spite of all the masterful intelligence work done by Archimedes Patti and his OSS team.  The Vietnam war was our fate.

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Intermission Story (1) – SeaBees on Bougainville

Submitted by: John R. “SEABEES COVER SELVES IN BOUGAINVILLE LANDING” – First Hand Account Landing under fire at Empress Augusta Bay, Bougainville, Seabees first joined with Marines in defending the beaches against counter-attack, then got busy on construction of military roads feeding front lines. The fighting builders ran one of their roads 700 yards in […]

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2016/04/07/intermission-story-1-seabees-on-bougainville/

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Weekly History News Roundup

JFK was unpopular in Canada… new book examines Kennedy legacy from Canadian perspective

 

Confederate flag rally in Gettysburg nearly turns violentNPS Rangers forced to separate counter protests

 

Nixon library completes $15 million renovation… new exhibit will highlight Nixon’s 1972 trip to China

 

Japanese internment in Alaska rediscovered… archaeologists pinpoint camp location near Juneau

 

New Civil War film details escape from Confederate prison… “Union Bound” is based on the diary of Sgt. Joseph Hoover

 

Heritage or hate?

Heritage or hate?

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Heroism Personified

John Basilone died on Iwo Jima this day in 1945…  Awarded the Medal of Honor for his bravery on Guadalcanal, Basilone suffered through two years of desk and recruitment duty following his decoration.  The Navy saw him as a valuable propaganda asset, but Basilone was a Marine.

Basilone

After tirelessly lobbying the War Department for combat duty… Basilone got his wish- he was headed for Iwo Jima.  While rallying his platoon under severe artillery fire, he and his men were all killed by a bursting shell.  He was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for heroism under fire at Iwo Jima… the Citation reads-

For extraordinary heroism while serving as a leader of a Machine-Gun Section of Company C, First Battalion, Twenty-Seventh Marines, Fifth Marine Division, in Action against enemy Japanese forces on Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands, 19 February 1945.  

Shrewdly gauging the tactical situation shortly after landing when his company’s advance was held up by the concentrated fire of heavily fortified Japanese blockhouse, Gunnery Sergeant Basilone boldly defied the smashing bombardment of heavy caliber fire to work his way around the flank and up to a position directly on top of the blockhouse and then, attacking with grenades and demolitions, single-highhandedly destroyed the entire hostile strong point and its defending garrison. 

Consistently daring and aggressive as he fought his way over the battle-torn beach and up the sloping, gun-studded terraces toward Airfield Number One, he repeatedly exposed himself to the blasting fury of exploding shells and later in the day coolly proceeded to the aid of a friendly tank which had been trapped in an enemy mine field under intense mortar and artillery Barrages, skillfully guiding the heavy vehicle over the hazardous terrain to safety, despite the overwhelming volume of hostile fire. 

In the forefront of the assault at all times, he pushed forward with dauntless courage and iron determination until, moving upon the edge of the airfield, he fell, instantly by a bursting mortar shell.  

Stout-hearted and indomitable, Gunnery Sergeant Basilone by his intrepid initiative, outstanding professional skill and valiant spirit of self-sacrifice in the face of fanatic opposition, contributed materially to the advance of his company during the early critical period of the assault, and his unwavering devotion to duty throughout the bitter conflict was an inspiration to his comrades and reflects the highest credit upon Gunnery Sergeant Basilone and the United States Naval Service.  

He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.

 

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Dogma Trumps Intelligence

America’s blind obedience to the dogmas of… monolithic communism and the Domino Theory led to tragedy of the Vietnam war.  In 1945, American intelligence officers established clear and firm links with the Viet Minh and its leader, Ho Chi Minh.  The Vietnamese nationalists of the Viet Minh were resisting Japanese rule and providing our OSS officers with valuable intelligence.  Ho Chi Minh sought the national self-determination Franklin Roosevelt seemed to be promising the world.  The OSS agents believed Ho to be the best alternative to govern Vietnam.  FDR let them both down.

Ho Chi Minh, Giap, and members of the OSS Deer Team

Ho Chi Minh, Giap, and members of the OSS Deer Team

America’s point man in Indochina was… Lt. Col. Archimedes Patti.  Dubbed “The Deer Team,”  Patti’s men contacted the Viet Minh and began to equip and train a select number of their best troops.  In return, the Viet Minh assisted in the recovery of downed American flyers, provided invaluable intelligence, and battled the Japanese.  With the surrender of Japan, Ho Chi Minh was prepared to move forward with Vietnamese independence- a dream thousands of years in the making.

Patti working with Commander Giap in 1945

Patti working with Commander Giap in 1945

Ho Chi Minh dined with Lt. Col. Patti in late August 1945… to discuss the transfer of power and disarming Japanese troops.  Near the end of the meeting, Ho presented Patti a document- a draft of the Vietnamese Declaration of Independence he planned to release on September 2.  Patti was taken aback to read the words of Thomas Jefferson quoted reverently in the brief document.  Both men toasted the future of an independent Vietnam… Patti remembers,   “We had him, we had Ho Chi Minh on a silver platter…the Soviets were in no position to help him-only we could…I did prepare a large number, and I mean about, oh, well over fifteen position papers on our position in Vietnam. But I never knew what happened to them. Those things just disappeared, they just went down the dry well.”

Patti meets with Ho and Giap

Patti meets with Ho and Giap

Roosevelt had already decided to give Indochina… back to the French.  Churchill insisted the French empire not be broken up, lest the British empire would follow.  Rather than disarm Japanese troops, British forces rearmed them and turned them against supporters of Ho Chi Minh’s government.  A temporary division of the country was allowed to solidify.  The OSS agents were marginalized, accused of fomenting revolution, and finally forced out of Saigon by the British commanders.  The expulsion led to the murder of Colonel Peter Dewey, America’s first casualty in Vietnam.  America had followed the wrong course, in spite of all the masterful intelligence work done by Archimedes Patti and his OSS team.  The Vietnam war was our fate.

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Weekly History News Roundup

DNA study casts doubt on British royal family… Richard III’s DNA reveal break in male line

 

Vampire burials studied in Polandnew research reveals truth about vampire graveyards

 

House votes to block benefits to former Nazis… unanimous vote to halt Social Security payments to Nazis hiding in US

 

Right-wing politicians in Japan rewrite history… journalists are targeted for exposing war crimes 

 

Study finds Americans are forgetting our Presidentslarge percentage of college students can’t remember Ford, Johnson, Carter

 

The adult view of 'Twilight'

The adult view of ‘Twilight’

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