Tag Archives: Little Big Horn

Book Review

Schultz, Duane, Custer; Lessons in Leadership, London, Palgrave

Publishing, 2010, ISBN 978-0-230-61708-7

Custerbook

 

Plenty of ink has been spilled over George Armstrong Custer in the last 30 years.  Recent archeology has provided new insight to Custer’s most famous battle, but studies of the great General’s life have reached an impasse.  Duane Schultz contributes a slender volume on Custer to the Great Generals series from Palgrave Publishing, and does his best to distinguish his work from the well worn Custer biographies.

“We built a foundation of thoughtful preparation, teamwork, and mutual understanding which has made our forces the most effective and agile in the world…We probably owe it all to Custer.”   Such insight would have provided much needed depth to Schultz’s biography, unfortunately this passage is found in General Wesley Clark’s introduction.  Clark contributes an interesting premise, Custer’s perceived recklessness provided valuable lessons to the American military.  Schultz’s biography doesn’t stray from the usual Custer fare- boy general, personally brave, heroic during war, always ambitious, chivalric soldier caught in the wrong type of struggle where he pays the  ultimate price.

In a surprising move, Schultz attempts to revive the story of Custer’s Indian love-child.  A rumor first promulgated by Custer’s enemy, Frederick Benteen, scholars discarded it long ago- most effectively in 1984 by Evan Connell’s  Son of the Morning Star.   Schultz relies upon questionable sources and unreliable claims in oral history to support a rumor that contributes little to our understanding of Custer’s character.  The revisionism of the late 1960’s and early 1970’s has been effectively refuted by more disciplined studies of the last 20 years.  Custer provided New Left historians with a suitable villain to the image of the noble savage- the exploitation of an Indian woman added to his disreputable resume.  Strange that Schultz would imply that the rumor could be true when well received studies from Connell, Jeffrey Wert, and Robert Utley have all relegated it to history’s ash heap.

An analytical study of Custer’s leadership and its effects on the evolution of the American military would be a valuable contribution to Custerology.  Duane Schultz’s brief biography does not fill that need, but it does provide a fast read on one of America’s more controversial figures.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review

Sibling Rivalry

Thomas Ward Custer rode to his death… along side his brother at the battle of Little Big Horn.  The dynamic, rowdy pair had been soldiers nearly all their lives.  Tom followed in his older brother’s foot steps, enlisting in the Union army at the age of 16.  Though George achieved more fame, he thought the world of his little brother, “Do you want to know what I think of him? Tom should have been the General and I the Lieutenant.”   The elder Custer was the youngest man to achieve the rank of Major-General while young Tom was one of 19 men to win the Medal of Honor twice.  Personally capturing two Confederate battle flags under severe fire (the second attempt nearly cost his jaw)  Tom was undoubtedly a hero.  The exploits of his older brother have relegated him to obscurity.

He won all the medals

George (Autie, as Tom called him) was austere, devoted, and a teetotaler….  Tom tried to emulate his brother, but strayed to drink and hell raising when his sister-in-law Libbie was not near to regulate him.  Together, the Custer boys were notorious pranksters, and few familiar with them on the frontier were immune from their antics.  Autie Custer had molded the 7th Cavalry into a fast-moving, hard-hitting combat unit;  His brother was with him every step of the way.  Detractors labeled them the “Custer Clan”, and resented the good fortune which seemed to follow the family, “Custer’s Luck.”  That luck ran out on June 25, 1876.  George, Tom, and baby brother, Boston Custer died on the dusty hills of Southeastern Montana.

Tom Custer was an American hero… He died bravely on the field of battle fighting for his country.  His enemies mutilated his body beyond recognition that day.  His remains were only identified by a tattoo on his wrist.  Ironic that warriors described as noble by our society are excused for such behavior.  Cultural sensibilities must be respected, even in the desecration of the dead.   Should we believe this?   More to come…….

Custer Clan

 

1 Comment

Filed under Ephemera

Bad Medicine

Myles Walter Keogh was born to be a soldier… the young Irish lad, stricken by the poverty of the Potato Famine, sought adventure and glory on the battlefield.  At the urging of the Catholic clergy young Keogh enlisted in the Papal army of Pious IX.  As a member of the Company of St. Patrick, Vatican Guards, Keogh was cited for gallantry by the Papacy three times.  When American clergymen came to Europe to recruit members of the Papal army for the Union cause, Keogh enlisted right away.

The real fighting Irishman

Fighting with distinction in the… Shenandoah valley, Keogh caught the notice of the Union high command.  George McClellan remarked, “a most gentlemanlike man, of soldierly appearance,” whose “record had been remarkable for the short time he had been in the army.”  Keogh fought with some of the Union cavalry’s hardest hitting units, including the division of General John Buford at Gettysburg and General George Stoneman on Sherman’s March to the Sea.  By the end of the war, he was one of the most distinguished young cavalry officers in Federal service.  Future Secretary of War John Schofield described Keogh, “He is one of the most gallant and efficient young cavalry officers I have ever known.”  Following the Civil War, he was promoted to Captain in the regular army and assigned to the 7th Cavalry, under the command of George Armstrong Custer.  On the Plains Keogh continued his meritorious service, but seemed to be afflicted by a melancholy streak, “Impudence and presumption carry with them great weight and a certain lack of sensitiveness is necessary to be successful. This lack of sensitiveness I unfortunately do not inherit.”  A life of military campaigning was taking a toll on the dashing Irishman.

Keogh’s marker at Little Big Horn

It is never a good sign when a soldier… prepares for a campaign by deeding his land to family, buying life insurance, and ordering his personal papers to be burned upon death.  Myles Keogh knew his fate awaited him on the campaign of 1876.  Keogh commanded half of the battalion that rode to destruction with Custer.  The troopers with Keogh battled in their own last stand on the ridges East of Custer’s position.  Keogh’s body was  surrounded by a ring of eight troopers.  He was one of two bodies not to be mutilated in the post battle atrocities.  It is said that the Papal medals he wore around his neck frightened the Indians; this soldier was considered “Bad Medicine.”

1 Comment

Filed under Ephemera, Uncategorized

Sibling Rivalry

Thomas Ward Custer rode to his death… along side his brother at the battle of Little Big Horn.  The dynamic, rowdy pair had been soldiers nearly all their lives.  Tom followed in his older brother’s foot steps, enlisting in the Union army at the age of 16.  Though George achieved more fame, he thought the world of his little brother, “Do you want to know what I think of him? Tom should have been the General and I the Lieutenant.”   The elder Custer was the youngest man to achieve the rank of Major-General while young Tom was one of 19 men to win the Medal of Honor twice.  Personally capturing two Confederate battle flags under severe fire (the second attempt nearly cost his jaw)  Tom was undoubtedly a hero.  The exploits of his older brother have relegated him to obscurity.

He won all the medals

George (Autie, as Tom called him) was austere, devoted, and a teetotaler….  Tom tried to emulate his brother, but strayed to drink and hell raising when his sister-in-law Libbie was not near to regulate him.  Together, the Custer boys were notorious pranksters, and few familiar with them on the frontier were immune from their antics.  Autie Custer had molded the 7th Cavalry into a fast-moving, hard-hitting combat unit;  His brother was with him every step of the way.  Detractors labeled them the “Custer Clan”, and resented the good fortune which seemed to follow the family, “Custer’s Luck.”  That luck ran out on June 25, 1876.  George, Tom, and baby brother, Boston Custer died on the dusty hills of Southeastern Montana.

Tom Custer was an American hero… He died bravely on the field of battle fighting for his country.  His enemies mutilated his body beyond recognition that day.  His remains were only identified by a tattoo on his wrist.  Ironic that warriors described as noble by our society are excused for such behavior.  Cultural sensibilities must be respected, even in the desecration of the dead.   Should we believe this?   More to come…….

Custer Clan

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Ephemera

Bad Medicine

Myles Walter Keogh was born to be a soldier… the young Irish lad, stricken by the poverty of the Potato Famine, sought adventure and glory on the battlefield.  At the urging of the Catholic clergy young Keogh enlisted in the Papal army of Pious IX.  As a member of the Company of St. Patrick, Vatican Guards, Keogh was cited for gallantry by the Papacy three times.  When American clergymen came to Europe to recruit members of the Papal army for the Union cause, Keogh enlisted right away.

The real fighting Irishman

Fighting with distinction in the… Shenendoah valley, Keogh caught the notice of the Union high command.  George McClellan remarked, “a most gentlemanlike man, of soldierly appearance,” whose “record had been remarkable for the short time he had been in the army.”  Keogh fought with some of the Union cavalry’s hardest hitting units, including the division of General John Buford at Gettysburg and General George Stoneman on Sherman’s March to the Sea.  By the end of the war, he was one of the most distinguished young cavalry officers in Federal service.  Future Secretary of War John Schofield described Keogh, “He is one of the most gallant and efficient young cavalry officers I have ever known.”  Following the Civil War, he was promoted to Captain in the regular army and assigned to the 7th Cavalry, under the command of George Armstrong Custer.  On the Plains Keogh continued his meritorious service, but seemed to be afflicted by a melancholy streak, “Impudence and presumption carry with them great weight and a certain lack of sensitiveness is necessary to be successful. This lack of sensitiveness I unfortunately do not inherit.”  A life of military campaigning was taking a toll on the dashing Irishman. 

Keogh’s marker at Little Big Horn

It is never a good sign when a soldier… prepares for a campaign by deeding his land to family, buying life insurance, and ordering his personal papers to be burned upon death.  Myles Keogh knew his fate awaited him on the campaign of 1876.  Keogh commanded half of the battalion that rode to destruction with Custer.  The troopers with Keogh battled in their own last stand on the ridges East of Custer’s position.  Keogh’s body was  surrounded by a ring of eight troopers.  He was one of two bodies not to be mutilated in the post battle atrocities.  It is said that the Papal medals he wore around his neck frightened the Indians; this soldier was considered “Bad Medicine.”

2 Comments

Filed under Ephemera, Uncategorized

Book Review

Schultz, Duane, Custer; Lessons in Leadership, London, Palgrave

Publishing, 2010, ISBN 978-0-230-61708-7

Custerbook

 

Plenty of ink has been spilled over George Armstrong Custer in the last 30 years.  Recent archeology has provided new insight to Custer’s most famous battle, but studies of the great General’s life have reached an impasse.  Duane Schultz contributes a slender volume on Custer to the Great Generals series from Palgrave Publishing, and does his best to distinguish his work from the well worn Custer biographies.

“We built a foundation of thoughtful preparation, teamwork, and mutual understanding which has made our forces the most effective and agile in the world…We probably owe it all to Custer.”   Such insight would have provided much needed depth to Schultz’s biography, unfortunately this passage is found in General Wesley Clark’s introduction.  Clark contributes an interesting premise, Custer’s perceived recklessness provided valuable lessons to the American military.  Schultz’s biography doesn’t stray from the usual Custer fare- boy general, personally brave, heroic during war, always ambitious, chivalric soldier caught in the wrong type of struggle where he pays the  ultimate price.

In a surprising move, Schultz attempts to revive the story of Custer’s Indian love-child.  A rumor first promulgated by Custer’s enemy, Frederick Benteen, scholars discarded it long ago- most effectively in 1984 by Evan Connell’s  Son of the Morning Star.   Schultz relies upon questionable sources and unreliable claims in oral history to support a rumor that contributes little to our understanding of Custer’s character.  The revisionism of the late 1960’s and early 1970’s has been effectively refuted by more disciplined studies of the last 20 years.  Custer provided New Left historians with a suitable villain to the image of the noble savage- the exploitation of an Indian woman added to his disreputable resume.  Strange that Schultz would imply that the rumor could be true when well received studies from Connell, Jeffrey Wert, and Robert Utley have all relegated it to history’s ash heap.

An analytical study of Custer’s leadership and its effects on the evolution of the American military would be a valuable contribution to Custerology.  Duane Schultz’s brief biography does not fill that need, but it does provide a fast read on one of America’s more controversial figures.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review