Tag Archives: Mel Gibson

Simply Awful History Movies Part 2

Early in 2000, the Smithsonian Museum of American History announcedit would assist in the production of an epic film about the American Revolution starring Mel Gibson.  Historians, history buffs, and living historians were further enticed by the original script detailing the exploits of “Swamp Fox” Francis Marion.  Disappointment with “The Patriot” started early, as producers ordered a substantial rewrite of the script after researching the complex life of Marion.  Apparently, a slave-owning Indian fighter cannot be heroic in a major Hollywood production.  Gibson instead portrays an anachronism- a South Carolina plantation owner who allows free blacks to work his land; a rebel torn between his family and the American cause.

Cute kids mask bad movie

Cute kids mask bad movie

It’s as if a group of impressionable, idealistic college sophomores… sat down and scripted the American Revolution “as it should have been.”  Young women stand up and chastise their elders in town meetings, slaves struggle for freedom in the deepest parts of South Carolina, and the evil imperialist British forces commit mass murder similar to the Oradour-sur-Glane massacre of 1944.  There’s plenty of speechifying, Gibson’s slow boiling, hunky Heath Ledger, and adorable children- but the film is woefully short on history.  Couldn’t the Smithsonian have advised on more than just costuming?  Gibson’s rage is incapable of overwhelming such a careless script  (the same script that compares British soldiers to Nazis.)  The Hollywood community doesn’t have the courage to make a film about the complexities of American history.  We are either preached to with politically correct drivel like “Dances with Wolves,” or insulted with comic-book nonsense like this monstrosity.

1776 or 1944?

1776 or 1944?

 

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under Movie Review

When Gibson Stays on Script

The storied 1st Cavalry Division… entered a new era of combat in October of 1965.  The unique topography and terrain of South Vietnam demanded a new type of combat unit.  The reliable 1st Cav. was there to answer the call.  The helicopter replaced the horse– air mobile infantry took the place of the traditional ‘grunt.’

“Hey Mel, I would have said it like this…”

Lt. Colonel Harold Moore was one of the officers …charged with molding the 1st Cav. into a hard hitting, but highly adaptive fighting force.  Moore related this story in his influential book We Were Soldiers Once…and Young.   Later dramatized in stunning fashion by director Randall Wallace, the film highlights the Air Cav’s first combat in Vietnam’s Ia Drang Valley.  Mel Gibson portrayed Moore with commendable restraint.  Gibson’s recent exploits and overacting make this performance notable.   The film, reviled by left-leaning critics, stands as a important testament to America’s fighting men in Vietnam.

Bringing the fight to the enemy

3 Comments

Filed under Ephemera, Movie Review

When Gibson Stays on Script

The storied 1st Cavalry Division… entered a new era of combat in October of 1965.  The unique topography and terrain of South Vietnam demanded a new type of combat unit.  The reliable 1st Cav. was there to answer the call.  The helicopter replaced the horse– air mobile infantry took the place of the traditional ‘grunt.’

“Hey Mel, I would have said it like this…”

Lt. Colonel Harold Moore was one of the officers …charged with molding the 1st Cav. into a hard hitting, but highly adaptive fighting force.  Moore related this story in his influential book We Were Soldiers Once…and Young.   Later dramatized in stunning fashion by director Randall Wallace, the film highlights the Air Cav’s first combat in Vietnam’s Ia Drang Valley.  Mel Gibson portrayed Moore with commendable restraint.  Gibson’s recent exploits and overacting make this performance notable.   The film, reviled by left-leaning critics, stands as a important testament to America’s fighting men in Vietnam.

Bringing the fight to the enemy

Leave a comment

Filed under Ephemera, Movie Review