Tag Archives: President

Weekly History News Roundup

Trump is no TrumanNorth Korea bluster cause bogus comparison

 

Diplomatic shortages damaging North Korean progress… Trump administration fails to accept history

 

Army refuses to rename base streets… NY Democrats demanded Confederate names removed 

 

50th anniversary of the Detroit Riots..1967 unrest changed the city forever

 

Trump donates first salary installment to Antietam battlefielddonation of $78,333   to repair battlefield structures

 

Trump’s money

 

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A Burning Hatred

The rivalry between Andrew Jackson and Henry Clay defined American… political history during the Age of the Common Man.  But this competition was far from standard, civil political discourse.  Clay and Jackson despised each other.

Merely a Military chieftain

Jackson infamously described Clay in the following vitriol:

“He’s the basest, meanest scoundrel that ever disgraced the image of his God….nothing too mean or low for him to condescend to…(Clay) is the Judas of the West.”

Just Sour Grapes?

Clay never believed Jackson to be fit for public office:

“He is ignorant, passionate, hypocritical, corrupt, and easily swayed by the basest men who surround him.  I cannot believe that the killing of two thousand Englishmen at New Orleans qualifies a person for the various difficult and complicated duties of the presidency”

 

Clay feared an unpredictable and potentially dangerous man… was using his martial popularity to win the nation’s highest office:

 

“But the impulses of public gratitude should be controlled by reason and discretion… I was not prepared blindly to surrender myself to the hazardous indulgence of a feeling… I solemnly believe General Jackson’s competency for the office to be highly questionable.”

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A Holiday for All Presidents?

Further proof that the trend of combining different commemorations into banker’s holidays… is truly foolish, look no further than Thomas Jefferson.

April 13, 1743- Just another day…

 

Upon entering the executive mansion… citizens began petitioning him for the use of his birthday as a holiday, he gently reminded them,   ‘The only birthday I ever commemorate, is that of our Independence, the Fourth of July.’  

 

When a formal request arrived from the Mayor of Boston… Jefferson explained it like this,   ” it is clear, disapproving myself of transferring the honors and veneration for the great birthday of our republic to any individual, or of dividing them with individuals, I have declined letting my own birthday be known, and have engaged my family not to communicate it.  This has been the uniform answer to every application of the kind.” 

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Facts in Five

1960 Primary election edition

JFK2

  • Only 15 states held primaries in 1960
  • The New Hampshire primary was not held until March 8
  • Vice President Richard Nixon won 89% of the Republican primary votes
  • Senator John Kennedy won 33% of the Democratic primary votes
  • President Eisenhower received .4% of the vote despite being disqualified by the 22nd Amendment
No sure thing in 1960

No sure thing in 1960

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The Verdict

Great men with larger-than-life personalities … do not always make the best Presidents.  Too much of their focus is directed inward, and the needs of the electorate are overlooked (see Jackson.)  Consistency is required when dealing with momentous issues.

In the right place at the right time

James Knox Polk was the right man… in the right place, at the right time.  He was not flashy, brilliant, cagy, or diabolical as many have charged.  Polk was steady, determined, erudite, and conscientious; some might even call him boring.  His presence demanded respect, but did not inspire awe.  He possessed a keen mind and was an excellent administrator.  Simply put, he got things done, with nearly no regard for his own legacy.

For too long revisionists in academia… have kept the real Polk from us.  Hopefully this blogger has been able to shed new light on an important figure long shrouded by academic misdeeds.  Polk now sits comfortably in the top ten lists of most Presidential historians…where he belongs.


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No Comparison at All

Listen to these words, I promise they're important

Listen to these words, I promise they’re important

Silly observers viewed President Barack Obama’s final State of the Union… address as some great moment in presidential oratory.  His supporters fawned over the milk-toast delivery and listless platitudes.  In politics, perception is indeed, reality- Obama’s supporters will always perceive him as a transcendental figure in our pantheon.  Many of us, simply yawned…

 

Here is what a substantive, memorable, and historic Annual Message… sounds like:

Fellow-citizens, we can not escape history. We of this Congress and this Administration will be remembered in spite of ourselves. No personal significance or insignificance can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass will light us down in honor or dishonor to the latest generation. We say we are for the Union. The world will not forget that we say this. We know how to save the Union. The world knows we do know how to save it. We, even we here, hold the power and bear the responsibility. In giving freedom to the slave we assure freedom to the free–honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve. We shall nobly save or meanly lose the last best hope of earth. Other means may succeed; this could not fail. The way is plain, peaceful, generous, just–a way which if followed the world will forever applaud and God must forever bless.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN
This is how you finish a speech....

This is how you finish a speech….

 

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The Verdict

Great men with larger-than-life personalities … do not always make the best Presidents.  Too much of their focus is directed inward, and the needs of the electorate are overlooked (see Jackson.)  Consistency is required when dealing with momentous issues.

In the right place at the right time

James Knox Polk was the right man… in the right place, at the right time.  He was not flashy, brilliant, cagy, or diabolical as many have charged.  Polk was steady, determined, erudite, and conscientious; some might even call him boring.  His presence demanded respect, but did not inspire awe.  He possessed a keen mind and was an excellent administrator.  Simply put, he got things done, with nearly no regard for his own legacy.

For too long revisionists in academia… have kept the real Polk from us.  Hopefully this blogger has been able to shed new light on an important figure long shrouded by academic misdeeds.  Polk now sits comfortably in the top ten lists of most Presidential historians…where he belongs.


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