Tag Archives: Racism

Weekly History News Roundup

The iconoclasm continues… “offensive” monuments to American Indians will fall next

 

Duke University symposium addresses monument removalpanels conclude monuments are not the problems we face today

 

Vandalism of Confederate monuments continues… North Carolina monument desecrated for second time this year

 

Katie Couric plans documentary about Confederate monument debatea fair and balanced approach is not in the offering

 

Profile in Courage Award goes to Mayor of New Orleans for tearing down monuments… Landrieu is so very shrewd in the spotlight 

 

James Madison Preparatory School in Tempe, Arizona  Presents:

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Listen to Lee

We must forgive our enemies

“It is the duty of every citizen, in the present condition of the Country, to do all in his power to aid in the restoration of peace and harmony…Dismiss from your mind all sectional feeling, and bring [your children] up to be Americans.”

 

“I think it wiser moreover not to keep open the sores of war, but to follow the examples of those nations who endeavored to obliterate the marks of civil strife and to commit to oblivion the feelings it engendered.”

 

“Sir, if you ever presume again to speak disrespectfully of General Grant in my presence, either you or I will sever his connection with this university. “

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Exit Interview pt. 2

A continuing examination of the Presidency of Barack Obama… partisanship is kept to a minimum, but the issues raised are the opinions of Practically Historical and its staff.

Another lecture

Another lecture

The Bad…

 

The clean energy conundrum:  Obama’s attempts to be the first “Green President” cost the tax payers hundreds of millions of dollars in bogus subsidies  and crippled traditional industries(costing thousands of jobs) with an undeclared war on the coal industry.   Considering that the United States accounts for less than 15% of the world’s CO2 emissions, Obama’s policies were decidedly ideological and at odds with the majority of the American people

 

Minding the store:  The 24 hour news cycle brings local stories national attention, completely skewing proper perspectives.  Obama’s seeming need to insert himself in local and state matters often blurred the lines of Federalism and confounded attempts at reforming law enforcement.  The “beer summit” and professed paternal bond with Trayvon Martin did more to divide the public than promote understanding.  Obama’s image evolved into that of lecturer-in-chief, castigating the public for what he considered their ignorance.  on matters of race, religion, and tolerance.

 

Selective Enforcement Syndrome:  Despite being declared “scandal-free” by partisans, Obama’s Justice Department was plagued by insidious ideological application of the law.  The half-hearted investigation of  IRS officials  targeting Conservative groups with audits and denying non-profit status based on ideology concluded without a single indictment; conversely, Attorney General Loretta Lynch promptly responded to Congressional Democrats demanding an investigation into secret videos of Planned Parenthood officials leaked by a pro-life group.  The DOJ refused to pursue any charges in the botched DEA operation called “Fast and Furious.” 

Another round was needed

Another round was needed

 

Next time–  The Ugly

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Actions Must Speak Louder….

Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964…. the most significant piece of civil rights legislation in our history.  No President in the 20th century more eloquently expressed the fight for civil rights as Johnson did in 1965,

“There is no Negro problem. There is no Southern problem. There is no Northern problem. There is only an American problem. And we are met here tonight as Americans—not as Democrats or Republicans—we are met here as Americans to solve that problem.”

A noble gesture

A noble gesture

Johnson also signed the Voting Rights Act… in 1965.  Johnson’s administration created the Department of Housing and Urban Development to oversee equality in public housing and all his Great Society programs were color blind.  He appointed Thurgood Marshall to the Supreme Court in 1967.  Johnson acted where his predecessors had only given lip service to the issue of civil rights.  Yet, his legacy is in doubt today, largely due to his off-color language and perceived personal prejudice. 

"I will have your support."

“I will have your support.”

Conservatives cite Johnson’s racial feelings... as proof that Democrats have never cared about minorities; that the GOP remains the party of Lincoln, the true civil rights champion.  Johnson’s civil rights record is just another conspiracy to dupe the ignorant masses into voting Democratic.  Reconciling personal feelings with our public actions has never been an easy task.  The 24 hour news cycle is driven by a culture dependent on sound bytes as the only acceptable measure of public figures.  Perhaps it’s time we start judging a person’s actions rather than snippets of their personal conversations…?

 

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Riddle Me That !

 

“I hope my days will end, at Monticello”

Revisionists perpetuating the allegation that Thomas Jefferson… fathered all of Sally Hemings’ children now believe history is on their side.  The pressures of political correctness have relegated reasonable discourse on the issue to the fringe.  A scholar who questions the findings of writers like Annette Gordon-Reed, must be prepared to be labeled a racist.  The discipline of history demands that consensus never be granted immunity, regardless of social convention or political correctness.  A fair evaluation of the evidence provides reasonable doubt in the revisionists’ narrative.  Thus far, they show little interest in fielding these questions:

  • Where was Sally ?  Jefferson was at Monticello nine months before the birth of her children (so was the rest of his extended family) but there is almost no evidence showing she was there.  Jefferson often leased his slaves to other farms in the Charlottesville area. 
  • Can we really trust the “conception windows?”   There is no way of proving that Sally Hemings carried her children full term.  Birth records from the 19th century make it difficult to see six full term pregnancies for one woman. 
  • Is the oral history truly reliable?  Madison Hemings was the only child to claim Jefferson was his father.  His descendents will not submit to DNA testing.  Eston Hemings descendents have the male Jefferson gene, but have never claimed to be descendents.  Confused yet?
  • Can we stop talking about secret passages?  It is well documented that revisionists have misquoted or ignored critical evidence proving no servants could have entered Jefferson’s bedroom without being seen. 
  • Are we ready to acknowledge the inconsistencies in the DNA testing?  There were 25 Jeffersons who possessed that Y-chromosome within 100 miles of Monticello.  Randolph Jefferson, Thomas’ brother needs further scrutiny. 
  • Why did Sally stop having children in 1808?   Jefferson took up full-time residence at Monticello in 1809, shouldn’t there be more children?  Jefferson was 64 years old when he allegedly fathered Eston Hemings in 1808. 
  • Can we throw Callender’s reputation back on the ash heap of history, where it belongs?  There is no proof he ever visited Charlottesville, the DNA test proved there was no ‘Tom’ Jefferson conceived in France, and no one can identify a shred of credibility in his reporting. 

“There are such things as moral impossibilities…”

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Actions Must Speak Louder….

Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964…. the most significant piece of civil rights legislation in our history.  No President in the 20th century more eloquently expressed the fight for civil rights as Johnson did in 1965,

“There is no Negro problem. There is no Southern problem. There is no Northern problem. There is only an American problem. And we are met here tonight as Americans—not as Democrats or Republicans—we are met here as Americans to solve that problem.”

A noble gesture

A noble gesture

Johnson also signed the Voting Rights Act… in 1965.  Johnson’s administration created the Department of Housing and Urban Development to oversee equality in public housing and all his Great Society programs were color blind.  He appointed Thurgood Marshall to the Supreme Court in 1967.  Johnson acted where his predecessors had only given lip service to the issue of civil rights.  Yet, his legacy is in doubt today, largely due to his off-color language and perceived personal prejudice. 

"I will have your support."

“I will have your support.”

Conservatives cite Johnson’s racial feelings... as proof that Democrats have never cared about minorities; that the GOP remains the party of Lincoln, the true civil rights champion.  Johnson’s civil rights record is just another conspiracy to dupe the ignorant masses into voting Democratic.  Reconciling personal feelings with our public actions has never been an easy task.  The 24 hour news cycle is driven by a culture dependent on sound bytes as the only acceptable measure of public figures.  Perhaps it’s time we start judging a person’s actions rather than snippets of their personal conversations…?

 

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Never Judge a Book….

Republican Senators opposed the nomination of John Marshall Harlan… to the Supreme Court in 1877.  They read his record as a Democratic activist and McClellan supporter in 1864 as clear signs he would be hostile to their agenda.  President Rutherford B. Hayes lobbied heavily for his nominee and confirmation finally came in November of 1877.   Reconstruction was crumbling all over the South- the Supreme Court was going to be drawn into the great debate over civil rights for former slaves.

The Great Dissenter

The Great Dissenter

Harlan evolved into an unlikely defender of civil rights… for black Americans.  The Court struck down major pieces of Reconstruction with its Civil Rights Cases decision in 1883.  Harlan voiced the lone dissent in support of Congressional authority in the Civil Rights Act of 1875.    Plessy v. Ferguson infamously paved the way for public segregation all over the South- Harlan again provided the only dissent:

“But in view of the Constitution, in the eye of the law, there is in this country no superior, dominant, ruling class of citizens. There is no caste here. Our Constitution is color-blind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens. In respect of civil rights, all citizens are equal before the law. The humblest is the peer of the most powerful. The law regards man as man, and takes no account of his surroundings or of his color when his civil rights as guaranteed by the supreme law of the land are involved….The thin disguise of ‘equal’ accommodations for passengers in railroad coaches will not mislead any one, nor atone for the wrong this day done.”

John Marshall Harlan is forever known… as the “Great Dissenter” in the annals of US History.  He stood as the lone voice of reason as the country slid into the murky depths of segregation.   Commentators in today’s media should not paint all historical figures with such a broad brush.  Nor should they only laud the  most radical advocates of a cause as the only commendable voices.  Harlan should be remembered…

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