Tag Archives: slavery

Weekly History News Roundup

The iconoclasm continues… “offensive” monuments to American Indians will fall next

 

Duke University symposium addresses monument removalpanels conclude monuments are not the problems we face today

 

Vandalism of Confederate monuments continues… North Carolina monument desecrated for second time this year

 

Katie Couric plans documentary about Confederate monument debatea fair and balanced approach is not in the offering

 

Profile in Courage Award goes to Mayor of New Orleans for tearing down monuments… Landrieu is so very shrewd in the spotlight 

 

James Madison Preparatory School in Tempe, Arizona  Presents:

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under News

Facts in Five

Daniel Webster edition

  • Webster is one of two men to serve as United States Secretary of State under three Presidents: Harrison, Tyler, and Fillmore.
  • Webster represented New Hampshire in the House of Representatives and Massachusetts in the Senate.
  • The leading Constitutional scholar of his day, Webster argued 223 cases in front of the Supreme Court.
  • Support for Clay’s Compromise of 1850 led to his resignation from the Senate that same year. 
  • Webster sought the Whig Party nomination for President three times… he never secured it. 
"I wish to speak today not as a Massachusetts man, nor as a Northern man but as an American..."

“I wish to speak today not as a Massachusetts man, nor as a Northern man but as an American…”

Leave a comment

Filed under Ephemera

Weekly History News Roundup

Slavery reparations issue refuses to fade awayConyers’ recent troubles should put an end to discussion

 

Trump’s bizarre call for a military parade… there have only been a handful in US history.

 

DNA shows darker skin in early Britons… tests indicate Cheddar Man to be different from previous theories

 

Charlottesville struggles to cover Lee&Jackson monumentsactivists are removing the shrouds each week

 

Congress votes to remove Jefferson’s name from Gateway to Westbill sent to Trump would rename the park “Gateway Arch National Park”

 

Shrouding our History

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under News

Weekly History News Roundup

Group of minor academics and critics want New York to remove “racist” statues… Mayor created special committee to review all markers on public property

 

Senate resignations are disturbingly common in history… More than 300 Senators have resigned from our most distinguished body

 

Slave cemetery from Civil War era may be under Tennessee baseball fieldarchaeologists confirm high likelihood of human remains at site

 

Historical preservation can boost local economiesstudies confirm that investment and government action can boost local revenue

 

Hitler’s limousine ended up in New York… the strange story of how a New York businessman bought the bullet proof Mercedes

 

Leave a comment

Filed under News

History Built on Complexity

Thomas Jefferson- slaver, master, racist, white supremacist, rapist– The cultural police want their version of history to be accepted far and wide, a continuing justification for their purging of our history and foolish iconoclasm….  They believe in relativism, but only when it suits their agenda.   When it comes to historical figures, there are only absolutes.  The iconoclasts refuse to study, debate, and learn from the complexities of history.

#StandwithJefferson

Remember that the evil slaver, Jefferson, included this passage in his original draft of the Declaration of Independence:

 “He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating & carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither. This piratical warfare, the opprobrium of infidel powers, is the warfare of the Christian King of Great Britain. Determined to keep open a market where Men should be bought & sold, he has prostituted his negative for suppressing every legislative attempt to prohibit or restrain this execrable commerce. And that this assemblage of horrors might want no fact of distinguished die, he is now exciting those very people to rise in arms among us, and to purchase that liberty of which he has deprived them, by murdering the people on whom he has obtruded them: thus paying off former crimes committed again the Liberties of one people, with crimes which he urges them to commit against the lives of another”

Can you read the words falling off my quill?

1 Comment

Filed under News

Wolf by the Ears

Jefferson wrote to John Holmes of the Missouri Compromise- “but this momentous question, like a fire bell in the night, awakened and filled me with terror. I considered it at once as the knell of the Union. it is hushed indeed for the moment. but this is a reprieve only, not a final sentence. A geographical line, coinciding with a marked principle, moral and political, once conceived and held up to the angry passions of men, will never be obliterated; and every new irritation will mark it deeper and deeper.”

Wolf by the ears...

Wolf by the ears…

 Missouri’s admission to the Union as a slave state… threatened the tenuous balance- 22 states, 11 with slavery, 11 without.  Missouri was the first territory carved from the Louisiana Purchase to apply for statehood.  Jefferson’s vision of America as a land of small, republican farmers was in danger of devolving further into the plantation gang labor system dominating the tidewater south. 

Henry Clay of Kentucky

Henry Clay of Kentucky

Henry Clay’s solution to the crisis is often reviled… by historians for perpetuating slavery and providing the United States the opportunity to conquer more land.  This New Left interpretation of history overlooks the contributions Clay made to our republic during its formative years.  His American System had revitalized the nation following destructive War of 1812.  Clay had convinced Madison, the National Bank’s most vocal critic, to recharter it in 1816.  He had rewritten the rules of the House of Representatives and established the post of Speaker as the force we know it today.  Firebrands bent on defending slavery at all costs- even peace and prosperity for all- could not be allowed to derail Clay’s vision.  The Missouri Compromise has to be studied from all points of view.

 

Clay’s Compromise saved the republic in 1820… arm-chair historians(like Jamelle Bouie @jbouie at Slate) are quick to condemn the Compromise as an extension of slavery- but what if the Civil War had started in 1820? Was there a leader like Lincoln on hand to defend the Union?  Would the people of the free states supported action against secessionists? If not for Clay, the slave-holding South would have emerged from this crisis in a stronger political position.  The Union may never have recovered and abolition would have been dealt a serious blow.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ephemera

Comparisons Must Make Sense

Edward Coles freed his slaves… and was a neighbor(at one time) of Thomas Jefferson.  Paul Finkelman wants to know why Jefferson couldn’t follow the example of this “contemporary.”   Professor Finkelman’s analysis suffers a fatal case of contrariwise-  Coles was following the examples set by his illustrious neighbor.

Just a kid

Jefferson and Coles were not contemporaries… Jefferson was 43 years older than Coles-  an overlooked distinction in Finkelman’s interrogatory.  Coles grew up and matured in a Virginia largely crafted by Jefferson.  The anti-slavery spirit so many associate with Coles was made possible by the liberal society Jefferson helped reform(we should also note that Coles freed his slaves in Illinois territory, not Virginia.)

You have done well, my son.

You have done well, my son.

Edward Coles was the perfect representation… of the generation Jefferson predicted would have an impact on slavery.  Much ink has been spilled about Coles writing Jefferson encouraging emancipation.  While Jefferson never emacipated all his slaves- his anti-slavery views and actions have been documented.  Coles’ activism was the next step forward in the cause, while Jefferson’s were becoming a footnote.  Jefferson said as much in response to one of Coles’ letters:

“The sentiments breathed through the whole do honor to both the head and heart of the writer. Mine on the subject of slavery of negroes have long since been in possession of the public, and time has only served to give them stronger root…. I had always hoped that the younger generation receiving their early impressions after the flame of liberty had been kindled in every breast, & had become as it were the vital spirit of every American, that the generous temperament of youth, analogous to the motion of their blood, and above the suggestions of avarice, would have sympathized with oppression wherever found, and proved their love of liberty beyond their own share of it….Your solitary but welcome voice is the first which has brought this sound to my ear; and I have considered the general silence which prevails on this subject as indicating an apathy unfavorable to every hope. Yet the hour of emancipation is advancing, in the march of time. It will come…”  Jefferson to Coles; Aug. 25, 1814

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized