Tag Archives: US Army

A Soldier’s Love

George McClellan said goodbye to his beloved… Army of the Potomac on November 11, 1862.  He cared deeply for their well being(much too deeply it turned out) and they repaid him with unwavering affection.  Lincoln had to make the decision- The “Young Napoleon” was fighting like the war could go on for decades.  But to his troops, he would forever be “Little Mac.”  He left them with this thought….

Little Mac

Little Mac

“In parting from you I cannot express the love and gratitude I bear to you. As an army you have grown up under my care. In you I have never found doubt or coldness. The battles you have fought under my command will proudly live in our nation’s history. The glory you have achieved, our mutual perils and fatigues, the graves of our comrades fallen in battle and by disease, the broken forms of those whom wounds and sickness have disabled—the strongest associations which can exist among men—unite us still by an indissoluble tie. We shall ever be comrades in supporting the Constitution of our country and the nationality of its people.”

 

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Facts in Five

Fallen Timbers edition…

Fear the "long knives"

Fear the “long knives”

  • The name Fallen Timbers was given to the battle because a tornado touched down a few weeks prior and knocked down hundreds of trees in a circular pattern
  • Mad” Anthony Wayne earned his nickname during the Revolutionary War; he ordered a night-time bayonet charge at the Battle of Stony Point in New York
  • Washington considered leading the third expedition himself (following the embarrassing defeats of Harmar and St. Claire) Anthony Wayne was considered a gamble by the military establishment.
  • Little Turtle urged his fellow chiefs to sue for peace following Wayne’s decisive movement north- Blue Jacket and the other warriors ignored the warning… The battle was over in minutes
  • The British commander at nearby Fort Miami had been providing shelter and supplies to Little Turtle’s army… the fort was not opened to the retreating warriors following  the battle.
  • The British cautioned Wayne, “Should you continue to approach my post in the threatening manner you are at this moment doing, my indispensable duty to my King and country and the honor of my profession will oblige me to have recourse to those measures…”

Wayne’s humorous reply, “…neither the fort nor its guns could much impede the progress of the Victorious Army under my command.”

Not so Mad after all

Not so Mad after all

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A Soldier’s Love

George McClellan said goodbye to his beloved… Army of the Potomac on November 11, 1862.  He cared deeply for their well being(much too deeply it turned out) and they repaid him with unwavering affection.  Lincoln had to make the decision- The “Young Napoleon” was fighting like the war could go on for decades.  But to his troops, he would forever be “Little Mac.”  He left them with this thought….

Little Mac

Little Mac

“In parting from you I cannot express the love and gratitude I bear to you. As an army you have grown up under my care. In you I have never found doubt or coldness. The battles you have fought under my command will proudly live in our nation’s history. The glory you have achieved, our mutual perils and fatigues, the graves of our comrades fallen in battle and by disease, the broken forms of those whom wounds and sickness have disabled—the strongest associations which can exist among men—unite us still by an indissoluble tie. We shall ever be comrades in supporting the Constitution of our country and the nationality of its people.”

 

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Filed under Ephemera, Uncategorized

Facts in Five

Fallen Timbers edition…

Fear the "long knives"

Fear the “long knives”

  • The name Fallen Timbers was given to the battle because a tornado touched down a few weeks prior and knocked down hundreds of trees in a circular pattern
  • Mad” Anthony Wayne earned his nickname during the Revolutionary War; he ordered a night-time bayonet charge at the Battle of Stony Point in New York
  • Washington considered leading the third expedition himself (following the embarrassing defeats of Harmar and St. Claire) Anthony Wayne was considered a gamble by the military establishment.
  • Little Turtle urged his fellow chiefs to sue for peace following Wayne’s decisive movement north- Blue Jacket and the other warriors ignored the warning… The battle was over in minutes
  • The British commander at nearby Fort Miami had been providing shelter and supplies to Little Turtle’s army… the fort was not opened to the retreating warriors following  the battle.
  • The British cautioned Wayne, “Should you continue to approach my post in the threatening manner you are at this moment doing, my indispensable duty to my King and country and the honor of my profession will oblige me to have recourse to those measures…”

Wayne’s humorous reply, “…neither the fort nor its guns could much impede the progress of the Victorious Army under my command.”

Not so Mad after all

Not so Mad after all

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Something More than a Cow

Cultural relativism teaches that atrocities…  committed by American Indians during the decades long conflict with the US government are acceptable because of the quasi-noble status bestowed upon them by academia.  Postmortem mutilations and beheadings  are seen as cultural oddities in our history, though we abhor them in other societies today.  No doubt, academics feel that Americans deserved the barbarous treatment because of the “crimes” that we carried out against “innocent” peoples.

Grattan Massacre site

Grattan Massacre site

The First Sioux War is a surprising case-in-point… the typical New Left interpretation holds that the noble Lakota were simply pushed too far by the broken promises of the US government.  Lost in all the politically correct gibberish is the fact that the US military was actually keeping the peace between the Sioux and the Cheyenne.  Sioux villages had migrated south to the Platte River basin, long the home of the Cheyenne- war was imminent.  To add more stress to the situation, long wagon trains of American settlers were traveling through the same region.  The tiny force garrisoned at Fort Laramie was hardly sufficient considering the volatile climate- the Sioux had nearly 2,000 warriors nearby led by the hot-headed, Red Cloud.

Out for blood

Out for blood

Lieutenant John Grattan and the 29 soldiers… killed with him on August 19, 1854 were victims.  Historians put words into Grattan’s mouth trying to vilify him, but his murder was a  complex event.  The Sioux villages, prepared for war against the Cheyenne(or Americans, whichever provoked them first) targeted the wagon trains during the hot summer months.  Lt. Gratten was forced to solve a civil dispute between a US citizen and a Sioux warrior who stole the man’s cow.  No Indian agents were available to mediate as required by the first Fort Laramie treaty.  Gratten wanted to stand his ground, Red Cloud was out for blood- 30 minutes later, Gratten and his men were dead.  Far from some preordained lesson handed down to the US Army- the Grattan massacre is a testament to the convoluted  and violent struggle for the future of western expansion.

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Facts in Five

Fallen Timbers edition…

Fear the "long knives"

Fear the “long knives”

  • The name Fallen Timbers was given to the battle because a tornado touched down a few weeks prior and knocked down hundreds of trees in a circular pattern
  • Mad” Anthony Wayne earned his nickname during the Revolutionary War; he ordered a night-time bayonet charge at the Battle of Stony Point in New York
  • Washington considered leading the third expedition himself (following the embarrassing defeats of Harmar and St. Claire) Anthony Wayne was considered a gamble by the military establishment.
  • Little Turtle urged his fellow chiefs to sue for peace following Wayne’s decisive movement north- Blue Jacket and the other warriors ignored the warning… The battle was over in minutes
  • The British commander at nearby Fort Miami had been providing shelter and supplies to Little Turtle’s army… the fort was not opened to the retreating warriors following  the battle.
  • The British cautioned Wayne, “Should you continue to approach my post in the threatening manner you are at this moment doing, my indispensable duty to my King and country and the honor of my profession will oblige me to have recourse to those measures…”

Wayne’s humorous reply, “…neither the fort nor its guns could much impede the progress of the Victorious Army under my command.”

Not so Mad after all

Not so Mad after all

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Filed under Ephemera